Team Develops Treatment For Canine Megaesophagus

Discussion in 'Veterinary News' started by Admin, Oct 20, 2016.

By Admin on Oct 20, 2016 at 1:46 PM
  1. Admin

    Admin Administrator Staff Member

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    The Veterinary Health Center (VHC) at the University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is pioneering a new approach to treat one type of canine megaesophagus, a devastating disease of dogs.

    The Veterinary Health Center (VHC) at the University of Missouri's College of Veterinary Medicine is pioneering a new approach to treat one type of canine megaesophagus, a devastating disease of dogs.

    A partnership between the VHC's Small Animal Internal Medicine, Radiology, Surgery, and Nutrition services and an investigator in the Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery department at the university's School of Medicine has resulted in the discovery of a breakthrough treatment for a subpopulation of dogs with megaesophagus. The Mizzou team has identified a defect of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) as a potential treatable cause of megaesophagus.

    Megaesophagus (ME) refers to a large, dilated esophagus with poor or no motility preventing normal passage of food and liquid into the stomach. With ingesta not reaching the stomach to produce the sensation of being full, the dog will continue to eat. As a result, the esophagus enlarges greatly. Dogs end up not getting enough calories so they waste away. Dogs with ME also regurgitate large amounts of undigested food and some of that material can be inhaled into the lungs. This inhalation can result in aspiration pneumonia, a dangerous additional symptom that kills many affected animals.

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Discussion in 'Veterinary News' started by Admin, Oct 20, 2016.

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